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Syncretism of Hinduism and the Other Religions in Indonesia and India

―Cases of Sang Hyang Kamahāyanikan and Kabīr’s Thought―

Shinobu Yamaguchi

Faculty of Letters, Toyo University,

5-28-20, Hakusan, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, Japan

Email: shinobu-y@toyo.jp

  1. Introduction

  In the history of its spread in South and Southeast Asia, Hinduism often encountered the other religions which are not only the ‘World Religions’ such as Islam and Buddhism but also local religions existing since ancient time. In the process, Hinduism seldom fought with or excluded the other religions but absorbed or was fused with them to some extent. In this paper, I would like to show some cases of syncretism of Hinduism and the other religions, especially in the medieval period of India and Indonesia. Here, in order to consider some structures of syncretism, we would like to see the description of Sang Hyang Kamahāyanikan which was compiled at Java, and the thought of Kabīr (1398-1448) who is the author of Bījak and gave the great influence over the medieval Hinduism and Sikhism founded by Guru Nānak in India of 15th century. By analyzing the forms of syncretism in both cases, we will see some characteristics in common and the difference between them. In the next section, let us start with seeing the syncretism of Hinduism and Buddhism mentioned at Sang Hyang Kamahāyanikan.

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CORRELATION BETWEEN PARᾹ AND APARᾹ VIDYᾹ IN HINDU PHILOSOPHY AND THEIR INTEGRATION WITH MODERN SCIENCE

By

Prof. Dr. Binayak  S.  Choudhury

Hindu philosophy, according to the traditional classification, is divided into six main streams which are collectively called ṣaḍ-darśana. These are Sāṁkhya, Yoga, Nyāya, Vaiśeṣika, Mímāṁsā and Vedānta. But this classification is not exhaustive. For instances, Pāśupata and Tantra are not included in the above group although they have important philosophical contributions and are inalienable parts of the Hindu system without which a complete description of Hindu philosophy is never possible. There are also other schools of thoughts in Hinduism. Again there are subdivisions of the above schools which, in their own rights, are capable of being treated as separate systems .The vastness of Hindu wisdom is awe inspiring.
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TWO TYPES OF KNOWLEDGE: PARAVIDYA AND APARAVIDYA

By
Swami Paramatmananda Saraswati

Human being is basically a cognitive person. We are blessed with a unique cognitive faculty called intellect and one needs to live intelligently. Living intelligently means to learn both the disciplines of knowledge…                                                                                                                                                                                  

There are two types of knowledge one needs to acquire :

  1. Wisdom of earning
  2. Wisdom of living

An educational system is incomplete without imparting the wisdom of earning.

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World Hindu wisdom meet 2017

Gubernur Bali

Gubernur Bali

I Made Mangku Pastika
The Governor of Bali
(Keynote speech)
Natya mandala isi denpasar, SUNDAY,June 11, 2017

At this era of  global system, hindus people should be able to live a good life, to meet their needs and realize their welfare based on religion teachings. Religion and knowledge should be able to make people “alive”. Otherwise it would be neglected.

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THE YOGA OF THE SUPREME SPIRIT

Summary of Fifteenth Discourse

THE YOGA OF THE SUPREME SPIRIT

THE YOGA OF THE SUPREME SPIRIT


This discourse is entitled “Purushottama Yoga” or the “Yoga of the Supreme Person”. Here Lord Krishna tells us about the ultimate source of this visible phenomenal universe from which all things have come into being, just like a great tree with all its roots, trunk, branches, twigs, leaves,flowers and fruits which spring forth from the earth, which itself supports the tree and in which it is rooted. Sri Krishna declares that the Supreme Being is the source of all existence, and refers
allegorically to this universe as being like an inverted tree whose roots are in Para Brahman, and whose spreading branches and foliage constitute all the things and factors that go to make up this
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TRI GUNA

Guṇa (Sanskrit: गुण) depending on the context means ‘string, thread or strand’, or ‘virtue, merit, excellence’, or ‘quality, peculiarity, attribute, property’.

TRI GUNA

TRI GUNA

The concept originated in Samkhya philosophy, but is now a key concept in various schools of Hindu philosophy. There are three gunas, according to this worldview, that have always been and continue to be present in all things and beings in the world. These three gunas are called: sattva (goodness, constructive, harmonious), rajas (passion, active, confused), and tamas (darkness, destructive, chaotic). All of these three gunas are present in everyone and everything, it is the proportion that is different, according to Hindu worldview. The interplay of these gunas defines the character of someone or something, of nature and determines the progress of life.
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